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Aage Bohr

Aage Niels Bohr (Danish: [ˈɔːwə ˌnels ˈboɐ̯ˀ] (listen); 19 June 1922 – 8 September 2009) was a Danish nuclear physicist who shared the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1975 with Ben Mottelson and James Rainwater "for the discovery of the connection between collective motion and particle motion in atomic nuclei and the development of the theory of the structure of the atomic nucleus based on this connection". Starting from Rainwater's concept of an irregular-shaped liquid drop model of the nucleus, Bohr and Mottelson developed a detailed theory that was in close agreement with experiments. Since his father, Niels Bohr, had won the prize in 1922, he and his father were one of the six pairs of fathers and sons who have both won the Nobel Prize and one of the four pairs who have both won the Nobel Prize in Physics.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Alasdair Gray

Alasdair Gray is a Scottish writer and artist. His most acclaimed work is his first novel Lanark, published in 1981 and written over a period of almost 30 years. It is now regarded as a classic, and was described by The Guardian as one of the landmarks of 20th-century fiction. His novel Poor Things won the Whitbread Novel Award and the Guardian Fiction Prize.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Anne-Marie Slaughter

Anne-Marie Slaughter (born September 27, 1958) is an American international lawyer, foreign policy analyst, political scientist and public commentator. She received a B.A. from Princeton University in 1980, an M.Phil from Oxford University in 1982, a J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1985, and a D.Phil in International Relations from Oxford in 1992. Most notably she is a member of the International Law Association, American Society of International Law, American Bar Association, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and World Peace Foundation. During her academic career, she has taught at Princeton University, the University of Chicago, and Harvard University. From 2002 to 2009, she was the Dean of Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Bert G. Kerstetter '66 University Professor of Politics and International Affairs. She was subsequently the first woman to serve as the Director of Policy Planning for the U.S. State Department from January 2009 until February 2011 under U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. She is a former president of the American Society of International Law and the current President and CEO of New America. She married Princeton professor Andrew Moravcsik; they live in Princeton with their two sons.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Antonio Damasio

Antonio Damasio (Portuguese: António Damásio) is a Portuguese-American neuroscientist. He is currently the David Dornsife Professor of Neuroscience, Psychology and Philosophy at the University of Southern California and an adjunct professor at the Salk Institute. Damasio heads the Brain and Creativity Institute, and has authored several books: his most recent work, Self Comes to Mind: Constructing the Conscious Brain (2010), explores the relationship between the brain and consciousness. Damasio's research in neuroscience has shown that emotions play a central role in social cognition and decision-making.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Ariel Dorfman

Vladimiro Ariel Dorfman is an Argentine-Chilean novelist, playwright, essayist, academic, and human rights activist. A citizen of the United States since 2004, he has been a professor of literature and Latin American Studies at Duke University, in Durham, North Carolina since 1985.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Arthur Kornberg

Arthur Kornberg (March 3, 1918 – October 26, 2007) was an American biochemist who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1959 for his discovery of "the mechanisms in the biological synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)" together with Dr. Severo Ochoa of New York University. He was also awarded the Paul-Lewis Award in Enzyme Chemistry from the American Chemical Society in 1951, L.H.D. degree from Yeshiva University in 1962, as well as National Medal of Science in 1979.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Benjamin R. Barber

Benjamin R. Barber is an American political theorist and author perhaps best known for his 1996 bestseller, Jihad vs. McWorld.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Colum McCann

Colum McCann (born 28 February 1965) is an Irish writer of literary fiction. He was born in Dublin, Ireland and now lives in New York. He is a Distinguished Professor of Creative Writing in the Master of Fine Arts program at Hunter College, New York with fellow novelists Peter Carey and Tea Obreht, and has visited many universities and colleges all over the world.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Elie Abel

Elie Abel was a Canadian-American journalist, author and academic. He lived in Palo Alto, California, United States.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Elizabeth Coleman

Elizabeth Coleman (born 1937) was the ninth president of Bennington College from 1987 to 2013. Following her graduation with honors from the University of Chicago, where she was a Ford Foundation Scholar, she completed her master's degree in English and American Literature at Cornell University, where she was a Woodrow Wilson Fellow. She received her PhD with distinction at Columbia University, where she was a Woodbridge and President’s Fellow.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Enrico Letta

Enrico Letta (pronounced [enˈriːko ˈlɛtta]; born 20 August 1966) is an Italian politician who was Prime Minister of Italy from 2013 to 2014, leading a grand coalition comprising the centre-left Democratic Party, the centre-right People of Freedom, and the centrist Civic Choice. He has also been a Member of the Chamber of Deputies since 2006. Letta was Minister of European Affairs from 1998 to 1999 and Minister of Industry from 1999 to 2001, and served as Secretary to the Council of Ministers from 2006 to 2008.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick was an American academic scholar in the fields of gender studies, queer theory, and critical theory. Her critical writings helped create the field of queer studies.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

G. H. Hardy

Godfrey Harold Hardy (7 February 1877 – 1 December 1947) was an English mathematician, known for his achievements in number theory and mathematical analysis. In biology, he is known for the Hardy–Weinberg principle, a basic principle of population genetics. In addition to his research, he is remembered for his 1940 essay on the aesthetics of mathematics, titled A Mathematician's Apology. Hardy also was the mentor of the Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Gerald Vizenor

Gerald Robert Vizenor (born 1934) is an Anishinaabe writer and scholar, and an enrolled member of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, White Earth Reservation. Vizenor also taught for many years at the University of California, Berkeley, where he was Director of Native American Studies. With more than 30 books published, Vizenor is Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley, and Professor of American Studies at the University of New Mexico.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

J. R. R. Tolkien

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, CBE was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor, best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

James A. H. Murray

Sir James Augustus Henry Murray was a Scottish lexicographer and philologist. He was the primary editor of the Oxford English Dictionary from 1879 until his death.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

James D. Watson

James Dewey Watson (born April 6, 1928) is an American molecular biologist, geneticist and zoologist. In 1953, he co-authored with Francis Crick the academic paper proposing the double helix structure of the DNA molecule. Watson, Crick, and Maurice Wilkins were awarded the 1962 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nucleic acids and its significance for information transfer in living material".

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Karen Armstrong

Karen Armstrong is a British author and commentator who is the author of twelve books on comparative religion. A former Roman Catholic nun, she went from a conservative to a more liberal and mystical faith.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Ken Robinson

Sir Kenneth Robinson (born 4 March 1950) is a British author, speaker and international advisor on education in the arts to government, non-profits, education and arts bodies. He was Director of the Arts in Schools Project (1985–89) and Professor of Arts Education at the University of Warwick (1989–2001), and is now Professor Emeritus at the same institution. In 2003 he was knighted for services to the arts.Originally from a working class Liverpool family, Robinson now lives in Los Angeles with his wife and children.

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao

Larry Brilliant

Lawrence "Larry" Brilliant (born May 5, 1944) is an American epidemiologist, technologist, philanthropist, and author of "Sometimes Brilliant."

Posted: 2019-03-03By: pandao