Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker

Born: August 22, 1893

Died: June 7, 1967

Nationality: American

Occupation: Author, poet, critic, screenwriter

Biography: Dorothy Parker was an American poet, short story writer, critic and satirist, best known for her wit, wisecracks, and eye for 20th century urban foibles.

Source/Notes: Quoted in The Algonquin Wits (1968) edited by Robert E. Drennan, and The Dispatch (October 1962)
Source/Notes: Quoted in The Algonquin Wits (1968) edited by Robert E. Drennan

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Source/Notes: Response to an editor pressuring her for overdue work, as quoted in The Unimportance of Being Oscar (1968) by Oscar Levant, p. 89
Source/Notes: On her abortion, as quoted in You Might as well Live by John Keats (1970)
Source/Notes: When asked to use the word horticulture in a sentence. As quoted in: The Algonquin Wits, edited by Robert E. Drennan (1968)
Source/Notes: Response on hearing the doorbell or telephone ring. As quoted in: " Dorothy Parker: What Fresh Hell Is This?" (1988) by Marion Meade
Source/Notes: A similar line was later used by Ira Gershwin in The Saga of Jenny in Lady in the Dark (1942): In 27 languages she couldn't say no. - Sunset Gun (1927)

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Source/Notes: Caption written for Vogue 1916 - Our Mrs Parker (1934)