Langston Hughes

Langston Hughes

Born: February 1, 1902

Died: May 22, 1967

Nationality: American

Occupation: Poet, columnist, dramatist, essayist, lyricist, novelist

Biography: James Mercer Langston Hughes was an American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, and columnist. He was one of the earliest innovators of the then-new literary art form jazz poetry. Hughes is best known for his work during the Harlem Renaissance. He famously wrote about the period that the negro was in vogue which was later paraphrased as when Harlem was in vogue.

Source/Notes: I, Too, Sing America, in the magazine Survey Graphic (March 1925); reprinted in Selected Poems (1959)
Source/Notes: My People, in the magazine Poems in Crisis (October 1923); reprinted in The Weary Blues (1926)

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Source/Notes: Song for a Dark Girl (l. 11-12), from Fine Clothes to the Jew (1927)
Source/Notes: Dreams, from the anthology Golden Slippers: An Anthology of Negro Poetry for Young Readers, ed. Arna Bontemps (1941)

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