Thomas Moore

Thomas Moore

Born: May 28, 1779

Died: February 25, 1852

Nationality: Irish

Occupation: Poet, singer, songwriter, entertainer

Biography: Thomas Moore was an Irish poet, singer, songwriter, and entertainer, now best remembered for the lyrics of The Minstrel Boy and The Last Rose of Summer. He was responsible, with John Murray, for burning Lord Byron's memoirs after his death. In his lifetime he was often referred to as Anacreon Moore.

Source/Notes: National Airs, Italian Air, "How Shall I Woo?" - From: "The Poetical Works of Thomas Moore: Including His Melodies, Ballads, Etc." (J. Crissy, 1841), p. 331
Source/Notes: As quoted in a letter from Lord Byron to Lady Melbourne, Jan. 16, 1814. From: "Lord Byron: Selected Letters and Journals" (Harvard University Press, 1982), p. 340 - ISBN: 9780674539150: "As Moore says “a pretty wife is something for the fastidious vanity of a roué to retire upon.”"
Source/Notes: "The Meeting of Ships" - From: "The Poetical Works of Thomas Moore: Including His Melodies, Ballads, Etc." (J. Crissy, 1841), p. 346
Source/Notes: "Oh think not my Spirits are always as light." - Quoted in: Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

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Source/Notes: The Poetical Works of Thomas Moore: Including His Melodies, Ballads, Etc. (J. Crissy, 1841), p. 123, "Epistles, Odes, Etc."
Source/Notes: National Airs, Spanish Air, "A Temple to Frienship" - From: "The Poetical Works of Thomas Moore, Volume 4" (D. Appleton, 1853), p. 152

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